Global index exposes Tanzania police force

14Nov 2017
Edward Qorro
The Guardian
Global index exposes Tanzania police force

THE Tanzania’s police force is among the lowest performing forces globally, according to an index released at the weekend.

Home Affairs minister Mwigulu Nchemba

The 2016 World Internal Security and Police Index ranks Tanzania at position 110 out of 127 countries measured in the index released by the International Police Science Association and the Institute for Economics and Peace.

Tanzania registered an overall score of 0.148 points, coming ahead of its regional neighbours of Uganda and Kenya which are at 124 and 125 respectively.

The index comes at a time when the conduct of the police force has been put into question.

Five months after the government apologised to people with disabilities over an assault by members of the Police Force in Dar es Salaam.

Mid this year, police in Dar es Salaam used excessive force, including teargas to disperse some disabled people, who thronged the office of the city municipal director, demanding that they be allowed to ride their tricycles within the central business district. In the process, they also blocked the road, forcing the Police Force to use excessive force to disperse them.

Home Affairs minister Mwigulu Nchemba described the incident as an unfortunate use of excessive force.

In April this year, the Amnesty International Report (2016/17) singled out the excessive use of force by the police in the country as some of the highlights of human rights abuse that rocked the country.

Botswana police service was ranked the best in Africa, and polling at position 47 globally.

Rwanda was ranked second best followed by Algeria, Senegal and Tunisia at positions 58, 68 and 72 respectively.

Other top performing countries in Africa include Egypt, Burkina Faso, Ghana, South Africa and Mali.

Nigeria’s police force ranks as the worst, just below DR Congo, Kenya and Uganda to make up the bottom four in the index that focuses on how much resources each nation devotes to internal security, whether the resources are used in an effective manner and whether the public view the police favourably.

Singapore was placed on top of the list as Finland, Denmark, Austria, Germany took the second, third, fourth and fifth position respectively.

"The countries are ranked based on ability of the police and other security providers in dealing with security issues," read part of the index.

According to the report, terrorism still remained one of the greatest threats to internal security, noting that it had increased dramatically over the last three years with more than 62,000 people killed in attacks related to terrorism between 2012 and 2014.

The index also assesses the current threats to internal security in each country.

The finding, which is the first edition of the World Internal Security and Police Index (WISPI), commissioned by the Sharjah Police Department of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the International Police Science Association (IPSA), and developed by the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP).

It measures the ability of the police and other security providers to address internal security issues in 127 countries, across four domains, using 16 indicators.

It also looks at four domains of internal security: capacity, process, legitimacy, and outcomes.