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Former TGU boss undergoes surgery

13th December 2012
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Former Tanzania Golf Union’s chairman Hussein Omari Kajuna, or popularly known as HK, has been admitted at the Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam since last week.

Omari has been troubled with a blood clot inside his head and a successful surgery has been done at the Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute (MOI) on Tuesday.

He said so far he is making a steady progress and gave a big thumb up to the hospital for the expertise that he did not expect.

Omari, who left Dare s Salaam to spend his post retirement life in Kanyigo on the shores of the Lake Victoria, said he has been highly impressed by the services rendered to him by the MOI doctors.

“I think we have superb facilities here than anywhere in the continent. Before the surgery I never thought to come out alive and these doctors have injected new hope in my life,” said Omari.

The burly Omari twice served as TGU chairman for a collective span of nine years before he stepped down in 2002.
He was a recreational golfer at the Dar es Salaam Gymkhana Club and played a huge role in the promotion of the game in Tanzania.

During his last tenure in power as TGU chairman, Omari conferred with the then Kenya Golf Union chairman David Ngugi to inaugurate the East African Golf Challenge Trophy when they met during Tanzania Open championship held in Arusha in 1998.

Their conversation eventually paid off with an introduction of the championship just a year later at the Dar es Salaam Gymkhana Club in July 1999 where three countries, Kenya, Uganda and host Tanzania, competed.

Kenya won the title beating the host nation by half a point.

It was Omari whose heroics and organisation expertise led Tanzania to win the only East Africa Golf Challenge title in 2002 at the Arusha Gymkhana Club before leaving the TGU reign to Gideon Sayore.

Omari has retired from playing the game but still maintains his passion with close follow up of the amateurs and professional tournaments in and outside the country.
 

SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN