Flexible workspace is the future, but it faces challenges

25Aug 2018
By Financial Times Reporter
DAR ES SALAAM
Financial Times
Flexible workspace is the future, but it faces challenges

Questioning how workplaces operate is remapping everything we thought we knew. In this fluid landscape, some will thrive and others will fail.

The revolution in flexible workplaces gives rise to innovations. File photo

This is the way markets function, but it is essential that both as an industry and as a government, there is an environment which supports and promotes workplaces and the customers they serve.

When the UK’s Business Centre Association (BCA) was launched it was into a world which was all about the corporates with a tiny space carved out for non-conventional operators. Fax machines were still used everywhere, and phone calls and letters rather than email was the way to communicate.

Twenty years on and advances in technology have transformed the way in which we can, and do, work. The revolution in flexible workplaces gives rise to innovations such as Hubud in Bali, a co-working space in paradise, fully connected and working with the rest of the world.

Flexible workspace culture is promoting a lifestyle, not just a place to do business

Where technology is often criticised for breaking down personal relationships, working environments are coming full circle with new generations of employees and companies pushing back against the traditional office in favour of community-focused offerings which also have wellbeing at the heart.

Alongside this is the emergence of disruptors promoting lifestyles not simply offices; brand is now as important for operators as it is for their business customers.

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