Pursuit of social justice must promote development and human dignity

13Jul 2016
Editor
The Guardian
Pursuit of social justice must promote development and human dignity

WORLD Day for International Justice, also referred to as Day of International Criminal Justice or International Justice Day is celebrated throughout the world on July 17 as part of an effort to recognize the emerging system of international criminal justice.

July 17 was chosen because it is the anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute, the treaty that created the International Criminal Court.

On 1 June 2010, at the Review Conference of the Rome Statute held in Kampala (Uganda), the Assembly of State Parties decided to celebrate 17 July as the Day of International Criminal Justice.

Each year, people around the world use this day to host events to promote international criminal justice, especially support for the International Criminal Court.

The day has been successful enough to attract international news attention, and for groups to use the day to focus attention on particular issues such as genocide in Darfur, Falun Dafa, and serious crimes of violence against women.

"With exclusion and inequality on the rise, we must step up efforts to ensure that all people, without discrimination, are able to access opportunities to improve their lives and those of others." Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations.
We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants.

We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of our global mission to promote development and human dignity.

The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice.

The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.

The General Assembly proclaimed 20 February as World Day of Social Justice in 2007, inviting member states to devote the day to promoting national activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the World Summit for Social Development and the twenty-fourth session of the General Assembly.

Observance of World Day of Social Justice should support efforts of the international community in poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all.

The world has changed dramatically. We no longer live in a world relatively empty of humans and their artifacts.
We now live in the "Anthropocene era" in a full world where humans are dramatically altering their ecological life-support systems. Our traditional economic concepts and models were developed in an empty world.

If we are to create sustainable prosperity, if we seek "improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risk and ecological scarcities," we are going to need a new vision of the economy and its relationship to the rest of the world that's better adapted to the new conditions we face.

We are going to need an economics that respects planetary boundaries, that recontinues the dependence of human well-being on social relations and fairness, and that recognises that the ultimate goal is real, sustainable human well-being , not merely growth of material consumption.

The new economics recognises that the economy is embedded in a society and culture that are themselves embedded in an ecological life-support system, and that the economy can't grow forever on this finite planet.

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