Coffee growers urged to practice organic farming for better yields

10Jan 2020
James Lanka
Moshi
The Guardian
Coffee growers urged to practice organic farming for better yields

The 32-Kilimanjaro New Co-operative Initiatives Joint venture Limited (G-32 KNCI-JVE LTD) has appealed coffee growers to practice organic coffee farming for sustainable high quality production for good health of consumers.

Speaking with the reporters here yesterday, the general manager of G-32 KNCI-JVE LTD, Gabriel Ollomi explained that, some members of his organisation will enjoy the fruits of organic farming-an agricultural system that uses-ecologically based pest control  and biological fertilisers derived largely from animal and plant wastes and nitrogen-fixing cover crops.

“In the year 2018/19 G-32 KNCI-JVE LTD engaged with our farmers in the organic coffee market where farmers benefited from high coffee prices by emphasising farmers to switch  to organic farming that has led them to live   happily earned   money to take care of their children and send them to school,” he explained.

According to Ollomi, organic coffees world market is going up day to day, appealing  to Kilimanjaro coffee producers to switch   to organic farming.

“Apart from high demand of organic coffees in the world market, its production is also very low as farmers are not buying industrial fertilizers  for production, thus they are using only ecologically based pest control  and biological fertilisers derived largely from animal and plant wastes and nitrogen-fixing cover crops.

“In the 2018/19 coffee season we bought a total of40.2 tonnes of parchment coffee at a price of 7,125/- per kilogramme from small farmers of Mwika Kinyamvuo and Mamba North Agricultural Marketing Co-operatives (AMCOS)…” the G-32 KNCI-JVE LTD general manager explained.

Ollomi  who is also a coffee producer at Lyamungo village, in Hai district, Kilimanjaro region further explained that, producing coffee through organic farming is cheaper than using industrial fertilisers and other agriculture inputs like coffee pest controls which are sold at high prices; and the world market for organic coffee is rising day to day and fetches high prices.

Commenting on the organic coffee farming, one of the small coffee producers who  moved  from inorganic farming to organic farming   Hansi Mangowi explained that, “The positive impact of using such industrial chemicals in growing coffee was  gives  better quantity of harvests but poor quality on the market price. On the negative side, conventional agriculture destroyed soil fertility that forced me  to cultivate  other food crops like banana, beans, maize within the same farm after every three years just looking for fertile land…”.

He added that, he has an experience of more than 13 years in the organic coffee farming and he was enjoying the fruits of getting good markets and high prices of his commodity.